I always encourage my students to tune in and watch some ladies’ golf when they can, and no better time to start than now. The Country Club of Charleston will host the 75th U.S. Women’s Open this week.

Not only will female amateurs learn a ton by viewing, but many males will as well. Not because their game matches up with the world-class talent on the LPGA stage; but because from an analytical standpoint, their numbers and stats are much more relatable. The swing and ball speeds, club selections, and yardages on the women’s tour are all very similar to that of your average male player. I don’t teach many students who can relate to Brooks Koepka hitting a 155 yard gap wedge, no matter how much wind is behind them. But the average club hit from 155 on the LPGA tour is a 6 or 7 iron. The average swing-speed is around 95 mph and the average ball speed is around 140 mph – both similar to that of your typical male golfer, regardless of handicap. Now don’t get me wrong, there are some women on tour who can put it out there 280 or 290. But that is not the norm across the board.

Because of the distance given up, the ladies have to be supreme ball strikers with flawless mechanics. Amateurs will learn a lot and benefit from trying to duplicate what they see the gals do on TV. Not only are the swing characteristics and fundamentals important to observe, but so is their course management skills. When you don’t hit 300 yard drives and 200 yard 6 irons, you have to play smart and limit your mistakes to succeed. Pay close attention to their short games also. What type of shot they play, and what club they choose to do it with. Be crafty, creative, and master those shots around the green.

You can work, work, and work to hit farther; and I can teach you how. But your scores will drop faster if you just learn how to hit it better. Hit it better, hit it less, shoot lower scores, and you’ll have your buddy’s cash in your pocket and that sandwich tastes just a little better at the 19th hole.

Enjoy the game and each other,

Seth Zipay, Head Golf Professional