Since pro golf returned 3 weeks ago, the narrative has been all about Bryson DeChambeau. He set a goal in the offseason to become the longest player on tour. A little extra downtime during Covid helped him achieve those new numbers, along with a new body, which includes a neck like a tree trunk and an upper body like a tight end. It looks like new Bryson ate old Bryson. His new approach, both physically and mentally, is not all show. He has been in contention to win every week. And we all know that 360 yard bombs are not the only ingredient to a winning recipe on the PGA Tour. You also need to hit greens, get up and down when in trouble, and roll the rock better than pretty much the rest of the field.  This past week at Detroit Golf Club he put all that together to clinch his 6th win on tour. He was the first player on tour since 2004 to lead a field in Strokes Gained off the tee and Strokes Gained on the green. He did this while averaging a record 350.6 yards off the tee.

Bryson is different. He’s extremely analytical and smart. They call him the mad scientist. But rarely does he seem mad. He takes himself pretty seriously but still comes across quite charming with the media and his peers. He once had his caddie spray each range ball with water so he could dial in his yardages accounting for the moisture he’d be playing in later that afternoon. But aside from altitude and barometric pressures, you still have to be good at getting the ball in the hole. And DeChambeau has been very good at that as of late. His new diet and workout program helped him add 30 lbs of muscle. He’s seeing lines off the tee that Rory, DJ, Phil, and a young Tiger or Daly wouldn’t dare notice. Bryson is one of two players in history to record 190+ mph ball speeds in a PGA Tour competition. Cameron Champ is the other. He swings like a World Long Drive competitor who has one ball left and needs a 420 drive for the victory, feet spinning out and all. But he’s doing this with trees, bunkers, and hazards on both sides on the world’s toughest courses, with no regards for human life or a bogey. Based on his resume’, Bryson is certainly not a novelty act who just hits enormous drives. He has an NCAA D1 championship, US Amateur, and 7 professional wins to his credit. If he can keep pairing his wedges and putter with his long ball, a major is certainly on the horizon. He probably wishes the US Open was tomorrow. 

It’s well documented that DeChambeau’s bag is as unique as he is. He plays one-length irons (all 7 iron length), with the thought of repeating the exact same swing and setup, no matter which club he is hitting. He also plays the largest grips on the market and has very little wrist-hinge, reminiscent of Moe Norman. Because of his new technique and positive attack angle (hitting up on the ball with driver), he is playing a 5.5° driver. You don’t see many lofts under 9° these days, even from the high speed players. In fact, his putter has more loft at 6.5°. Bryson is the poster boy for the phrase “There’s not just one way to get the job done and play the game.” Let’s dive into his bag and see what he played for his epic win in Detroit. 

Driver – Cobra King Speedzone, 5.5°, L.A. Golf BAD Prototype 60x shaft

2-wood – Cobra Speedzone Tour, 13.5°

3-wood – Cobra King LTD, 14.5°

Irons – (4-5) Cobra One Length Utility (6-PW) Cobra Forged Tour One Length

Wedges – Artisan Golf 50°-55°-60°

Putter – SIK Tour Prototype Counterbalance

Ball – Bridgestone Tour B X

Bryson DeChambeau’s Diet

His daily calorie intake is something I can get behind. The hours of cardio and weight training…not so much.

Breakfast – 4 eggs, 5 slices of bacon, toast, 2 protein shakes

Lunch – Peanut butter & jelly sandwich, a couple GoMacro bars, 3 protein shakes, and snacks while playing and practicing

Dinner – Steak, potatoes, 2 protein shakes

Fantasy picks Let’s stick with the theme here and celebrate yours’ truly successfully picking Bryson DeChambeau to win the Rocket Mortgage Championship! Ok, ok. So that was about as tough as picking Tiger to win a major back in 2000. But I digress, golf is hard. And picking the winner is incredibly hard. Viktor Hovland also had a great finish with a T-12, but my sleeper Rory Sabbatini missed the cut. We now head a couple hours down I-71 from Golf HQ to Columbus to the House That Jack built, Muirfield Village, for an unprecedented back-to-back tournaments. First up is the Workday Charity Open, taking the place of the John Deere. Winner Rickie Fowler He’s trending in the right direction and has 2 career runner-ups at Muirfield. Time to return to the winner’s circle. Will contend Matt Kuchar He’s won here and has 10 career top-15 finishes. I think he liked the golf course. Sleeper Kevin Streelman Finished 2nd at Traveler’s and has 3 career top-10’s at Muirfield.

Enjoy the game and each other,

Written by Seth Zipay – Head Golf Professional
Design and Published by Craig Walton